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privatized. all of the higher education is being privatized. all through the uc system. how do you run a modern state with tax cuts? we resort to desperate, back last november, we were asked to vote to make four indian casinos in san diego county pony up money. i thought this was a joke. they voted to do it. now, the governor proposes to borrow against future revenues. how did they deal with these social problems when the economic problems were far worse than what we can imagine today? this is from larry halprin's. and it has these quotes from roosevelt on the wall. he said in one of his talks to the people, "the test is not whether we have more, it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little". it's a different philosophy than that which we have become used to. what i am going to show you is a lost civilization. it's a strange place. and yet, it becomes oddly familiar after a while because we built it and use it every day without knowing it. it has been buried. the living new deal project is like an archaeological dig. we are going after the new deal in california, but h
throughout the country. education was the gateway. access to education would provide a better future for the children. today that belief remains the same. education is a pathway for future success. however access to high quality education still remains an illusions to many children. too many african american and other people of color remain segregated in other schools and determined desperate and in later life. a huge gap in problems across the country. add to that the concept of unconscious bias, low expectations and high expulsion and suspension rates and it's so many reasons why they fall below the bar. even in san francisco where we have the highest performing schools we have the highest achievement gap among african american and latino students. we need to invest more in the future of our young people. in 1964, dr. king said, the richest nation on earth has never allocated sufficient schools to allocate teachers. we squander funds on highways, on the pursuit of recreation, on the over abundance of over kill arm meant but we pop rise education. even those these words were 50 year
was also nominated by president obama to serve in her role as assistant secretary of education for civil rights and she was confirmed by the senate in may of 2009. as assistant secretary, ruslyn is assistant secretary arnie's duncan's primary advisor. before she joined the department of education she was vice president of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing everyone together to stop this disturbing trend so please welcome assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. as i said, our moderator is not always our lieutenant governor, of course he needs to introducti
educate. but we must go beyond thinking more rigor will get us better achievement. we have to remember a school is a community and in a xhuept, people look out for each other. they've got each other's back. how do we begin to promote that idea that we are in this thing together? we believe it's through, unfortunately but truly, self-interest. kids are driven developmentally by the desire to fit in, to belong, to be part of an affinity group. if we can capitalize on their desire to look out for their friends and give them some more tools and opportunities and support, they will begin to do what we need them to do to at least confront it in their own small cell of social influence and the compounding and leveraging of that begins to make change. so the question we have to ask ourselves, are we as adults willing it slow down enough to invite kids to sit down at the table with us and partner? do we have the courage to understand that inclusion takes time and we have have to work more diligently to i invite young people, particularly marginalized young people, to take part. >> you menti
transforming our education system as described as struggling in the past with a lot of different barriers and opening up to our effort to involve a larger picture of what our residents and their families really want to do in the great city of san francisco and how do we attract those families to stay here. i go to technology visits every tech tour tuesday and meet with thirty or 40 employees of those companies and many of them know their ipos won't come in like other families they want to be here and work in jobs by the first thing is what are we doing that the schools. that's the birthing sign of viechltd. the best investment is to create a family here because that means you've got fabricate in the way we've treated our schools and the private-public partnering we have. in addition the technology gap that sales force is helping us today with offer $1.7 million in the other person ipads and the tinge goes with it is the training of features tea administrators. that's similar to what auto deck zinc gesture offers. it's the support mechanisms. it's one thing to announce the gift bus it's th
faintly business. but education america went work out doubt from the best education to almost god awesome now. we still have the best education in america and quality out of the graduate school is great but national level education is required a lot of the work we do out of the lab is in the energy spates. at the scale you want to effect the economy one of the revolutions is going to be the transfer from a economist economy. there's a lot of manufacturing in that and we don't have policies on robotics to make those things. so things are much bigger in the maker movement in terms of impacting the economic we're not having consistent policy >> the carbon basis life form i'm concerned. >> you've been replaced by a robot. >> i have a couple of things one is at a simplistic level. there's this rhetoric we need to reforearm the defeat it's a global economy and when you look at the parts and supplies and protection policies that seems like a good idea until you realize you're using parts from all over the accruing world. and the granted program be reapplied into a national program that complo
about college education. >> to start your life 80 grand in the hole with your art history major or mid-eastern studies and not finding work, that's why you have to -- >> for that, he is supposed to be the mad one. that's for starters and sets the record straight live on this very show. return to the great sinkhole, one of my favorite guests. we will begin with the big story. obama care fiasco and the president apologized. everyone is apologizing and while secretary sebelius was apologizing and talking about the disaster, the health care website he was apologizing about was crashing. it was almost comical. the president took aim at republicans for trying to destroy his law. >> health care is complicated and very personal. it's easy to scare folks. and it's no surprise that some of the same folks trying to scare people now are the same folks who have been trying to sink the affordable care act from the beginning. >> joining me now is the chairman of the republican national committee. you guys have gone from being the villains to suddenly the heroes. how on earth did this happen? >> it's
of my question is, i'm also an educator. i get invited to distillery around the world and which draws a lot of attention for our expertise and spirits and i do a lot of education. i'm a national education bar tenders guild. the liquor laws don't allow us to use alcohol in training. the bar tenders schools in california are a joke. it's a cheap industry where hopeful bar tenders are hoping to take a $300-500 course to use colored liquid. if we are expected to do this for educational purposes, i imagine that we have to do the same thing, to go through the legislators to propose that to the public and propose it to the abc. i believe this nightlife summit was create because of problems in the public, there was problems with noise, problems with over drinking, a lot of our laws are based on that. i'm here to propose that we have more responsible training for our bar tenders and servers. the cocktail boom around the country has turned bartenders into a true professional. now that professional bartender's job is in question. >> i'm sure it's around the whole notion of where you can drink a
bringing the film and educating, training professional development largely thriewr our partnership with them and provides that to school districts and classrooms across the country for free, so educators can sign up, and if they agree to do the training and to take it seriously and embed it with the kids and the adults in the community we provide them with oftentimes busing, but often free tickets so they can see the film outside of school and make it an event and that is our project "1 million kids". we're doing it in a big way here in the bay area thanks to the leadership in this community. yep and oakland and all over. it's just awesome and in cleveland and right now we have 13,000 students across the basin in salt lake city are seeing it, and does have impact and the impact is largely i would say it creates a sense of agreement. the biggest thing that bully does or the big service the film has is gives everyone a unified collective science of agreement to which they roll up the sleeves and get busy creating change and has been really exciting. i building we already i belie
and the board of education. i want to recognize our clerk today from sfusd and we want to thank our staff at sfgtv who make our meetings public and transcribe all of our public meetings. first, i do need to take a motion to excuse commissioner wynns from today's meeting and also supervisor breed, who are you replacing today? >> i'm replacing supervisor avalos. >> okay. so we need a motion to excuse commissioner wynns and supervisor farrell. can we take that motion? we'll take that motion without opposition. in their places we have supervisor london breed and we are joined by hide era mendoza. we have we are item on our list. please call the item. >> the clerk: item 1: hearing - san francisco unified school district's science, technology, engineering, and mathematics programming]1310101.sponsor: kimhearing to present san francisco unified school district's package of initiatives related to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics programming, including the mayor's middle school leadership initiative, at the joint city and school district select committee >> the clerk: sf 11234 >>
and supporting teachers on-site and the plc learning community of educators leading this work. all schools have had wireless technology to be effectively able to use technology. that's been very exciting. students and teachers are actively using this intentional to enhance learning and school experiences. here is a highlight. i don't know if you can see the photos of students using and engaging in the ipads. they are very excited. i can't tell you how thrilling it has been from the ground up to getting the project up and running to see the devices with the students engaging with the technology on a daily basis. next steps. so i'm sure many of you have heard about the visioning work that our district is undertaking called vision 25. we are in the process of setting and defining the space with the mayor. the planning process will now expand to middle grades of k-8 and we'll folks on -- focus on long-term and short-term for our middle use of family experience. are there any questions? >> really this is more of a comment. i'm glad you addressed the k-8 issue. i wanted to for the benefit of our c
produce from one to the other, and educating both parties along the way. >> may need a look at the progress of a particular crop or report back, maybe some feedback, to the farmer about how the chefs are using it or what they might be looking for in the near future. >> in many ways, produce express and people like jim mills are the link between 1,300 different restaurants in northern california and produce from all over the golden state. today's visit took us to del rio botanical farm in yolo county, where suzanne peabody ashworth was keen to get restaurants to start trying the fresh fava beans and greens she's growing. >> so we'll take some of these greens into a couple of restaurants this morning and see what the chefs want to do with them. in sacramento, there's been an explosion of restaurants over the past 4 or 5 years in our capital. again, sacramento, california, agriculture, fruits and vegetables--there's a very bice link there and the interest that my customers have in this produce. >> we call at 5:30 in the morning and get the normal order, and then, along about 7:
turn to two percent of your monthly income. >> you can enroll in free educational services online. just as it -- visit sfsmartmoney.org. with services like financial education classes and one-on-one meetings with advisers, asset smart money network makes it easy for you to learn all you need to know about managing, saving, investing, and protecting your money. the network offers access to hundreds of financial aid programs. to help their eruptions, fill out the quick questionnaire, and you will be steered to the program you are looking for. >> who want to make sure everyone has the chance to manage their money successfully, keep their money safe, and avoid getting ripped off. >> it sounds very good. i think people should try that one. >> to find out more, visit sfsmartmoney.org or call 211 and ask about the bank on s.f. program. >> now you can have a bank account. open one today.
. the other thing that we are moving towards in education is more digital. we'll see less textbooks and more digital learning and with that we are promoting a digital literacy policy which deals with a number of issues and i'm going to go back and look at the draft policy to see how well it deals with the kind of issues rob and your family have dealt with in terms of using the internet safely and being aware of the harm you can do to yourself and to others by the way digital news can get around. >> assemblyman. >> thank you very much. i'm very, very heartened. this was an issue that's been in the closet for too long. i think high profile nationally now as well and we have super stars involved, lady gaga, myself, but you got to reach young people. usually peers are the best, i think, in terms of communicating things and then absolutely the parents. let's keep working, i'm only as good as the information i have and so we want to do the most effective long-lasting legislation. you know what happens sometimes, something is written in law but the attitudes don't change. so that is the human
, but coming up the pga is coming to the bay area. and, two big events to raise money for education. that's all coming up in just a few minutes. ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, world. cbs reporter louisa hodge s us the rare fossil, accideny unearthed by a c >>> it's the buzz of the dinosaur world. >> cbs reporter luissa hodge shows us the rare fossil accidentally unearthed by a california timer. >> this fossil of dinosaur nicknamed joe is the most complete skeleton ever found for a plant eating dinosaur. it's also the youngest and smallest of its kinds. but for these elementary students, it left big impression. >> it he -- he told us we were going to be the first to see it. >> what did you think? >> that's awesome. >> a high school student found fossil on an excavation dig in southern utah. >> he spotted a piece of bone, called me over. i ignored it. i thought it was a fragment. but then we later learned it was the tip of a nearly complete dinosaur skeleton. >> it took 1300 hours of work to remove rock from the bone. that's after the channeling process of dig up the skeleton. >> we couldn't just carry it
back to a point where you go through the normal process of moving the bills, the labor education bill, the defense bill, move them all individually. there is not enough time when we talk about the calendar. there is not enough time to move all of the bills individually at this point. host: sarah from dover, pennsylvania. caller: good morning. i would like to change the subject a little bit if i can. i live on medicare. the medicare and food stamps -- i am surviving on $125 a week. if they take food stamps away from me -- the -- [indiscernible] he needs to feeds us first before he feeds anyone else. and also, we have a place to live. our guys come home from the service. they are losing because they have no place to live. i would like to see that to happen, too. thank you. host: there is a story in politico. the headline talks about the farm bill that it gets no respect, referencing rodney dangerfield. why is this an important discussion happening? guest: the last time we had a farm bill, that law expired in 2008. what is it, 2013? it has been five years since we had a new farm bill pas
of the mayor's office and on the fourth floor. i feel my education and preservation experience and background related to city hall's restoration give me expertise and thank you firing consideration >> any questions? >> i can't think of a question but thank you for your service. >> any public comment on this item? >> good afternoon, supervisors happy halloween to supervisor breed, yee and cowen. i'm here as the chair of the city hall preservation advisory commission. patrick and i have known each other for a very, very long period of time. the recession of this building special tours involving international architects who have come to view this building and he is absolutely incredible. he posed a passion a passion which can't be super composed it has to come within. patrick is certainly a person who has this kind of passion and will add to our commission greatly. we've been without an architecture person in that role for a long time and he will fill it incredibly well. it is my recommendation that he be appointed and approved to the city hall preservation commission and is in place in one
for guilt is the norm at nearly all colleges. in 2011, the department of education ruled preponderance of the evidence is the right standard. it means that colleges require only a fraction more than 50% belief in guilt. they found him guilty banning him from campus for at least three years. >> i broke down and i was crying. you know, i was just devastated. so we walk out of the door, and i remember i dropped to my knees, and that's when i really lost it just started balling. >> i would not ever want to see my child looking the way that he looked. he alternated between rage and then he would just absolutely collapse down on the floor and just sob and sob and sob. >> they feared he might face even more serious consequences. >> so when i got found guilty at und, all of a sudden in my head the thought is if they found me guilty what is to stop a jury from finding me guilty and sending me to jail for 25 years to life. >> were you worried about the stigma? >> horribly. we didn't tell anybody. not even my family. >> the grand forks police department investigated the complaint. but a detective
youth who are watching our program or who are friends with you. they would envy the kinds of educational experiences that the two of you have. they are probably thinking that, maybe when i get to senior high school or go to college, i may want to have an overseas educational experience whether it is for one year or two years. what would be your word of advice to them if they are thinking of spending a year or so in a different country, in a different academic institution? >> it's a great experience. you do need to live in different environments in order to understand other people more. if you are from taiwan and you go to an english majority speaking environment, you do have that experience of feeling like a minority. it's one i think is necessary in order to develop empathy and understand others, and not just be looking inside only. it is when you have these different kinds of experiences to draw upon that you can connect with different people. that is extremely beneficial. >> and gina, you feel the same way? >> yes, you are just expanding your horizons by traveling abroad. the people t
professor craig wilder reveals how the slave economy and higher education grew up together. that "the american campus to it as a silent monument to slavery." welcome to democracy now! talk about america's most elite universities. what relation do they have to slavery? >> i think there are multiple relationships. the first and probably most provocative is the relationship to the slave trade itself. in the middle of the 18th century, from 1746 to 1759, fewer than 25 years, the number of colleges in the british colonies triples from 3 to 9. it triples and that 25- yearperiod which coincides with the height of the slave trade. it is precisely the rise in the atlantic economy based on the african slave trade that allows for this fantastic articulation of new growth of the institutional infrastructure. >> let's talk specifically about particular universities. you do look at some universities in the south, but also in the deep north. harvard. >> it is a very northern story. when you think about the colonial world, until the american revolution, there's actually only one college in the south,
. and also the mayor's advisors of education and family services. please welcome hydro mendez. come on (clapping) thank you allen. i like that the current because there will be more. it's such a delight to be here in our home and thank you four joining us in city hall. i want to thank the neighborhood services we celebrate all our event in san francisco. i wanted to not spend a lot of time why we're here it's so obvious. the richness of our cult and history needs to be celebrated. i'm happy you're here who we are as the filipinos and the richness of our heritage we want to share throughout san francisco and california every day. this isn't just the most it's one of the many months we celebrate. tights high honor to be up here someone who is special to all of us mayor ed lee was sworn in on january 8th as our ferd mayor of the city and county and inform and the first asian american in the history. with this being the second largest population in the united states and the largest population in the state you mayor ed lee have made us proud. nearly 15 percent of the workforce of nearly
$40 a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. his day of coaching begins with knee pain, when... [ man ] hey, brad, want to trade the all-day relief of two aleve for six tylenol? what's the catch? there's no catch. you want me to give up my two aleve for six tylenol? no. for my knee pain, nothing beats my aleve. ♪ [ male announcer ] the parking lot helps by letting us know who's coming. the carts keep everyone on the right track. the power tools introduce themselves. all the bits and bulbs keep themselves stocked. and the doors even handle the checkout so we can work on that thing that's stuck in the thing. [ female announcer ] today, cisco is connecting the internet of everything. so everyone goes home happy. >>> i don't buy that. all right. across the country -- i don't know why. hey, welcome back. we've been having arguments all during the break. across the country 18 states are sending home so-called fat letters
hungry and going to school trying to get an education hungry. some of that is alleviated. we have a school lunch, school breakfast program that is functional, put the lot of people who would otherwise be hungry into some kind of food security. here is a problem, doesn't exist in the summers, there has been a lot in the literature about the education value of the summer when kids regress education leave. the other thing that happens in the summer is poor kids get hungry. a lot of localities recognize that and created these institutions that have a horrible sounding name, some are feeding programs, places where low-income kids can go to get meals, parks, community centers, sometimes properly funded, sometimes the federal government steps in with money. a couple years ago the federal government stepped in to st. louis with a pilot program to send 10,000 low-income kids who would otherwise go hungry in the summer, here was the response on the radio. after this program, it, quote, created surface people who woer never have a work ethic paula 0 we call him a schoolyard bully. he is a gu
of the discussion. we've got federal, state and local policy makers, elected officials, educators, law enforcement officials and leaders from the private and public sector, all of whom have traveled here from washington, dc from sacramento and all over the bay area. so thank you for being here today. we are grateful for an opportunity to come together with you to create schools and communities where young people are healthy and safe and feel welcome and they are allowed to learn and they are allowed to thrive. this day is devoted to help all of us deepen our understanding of this issue of the problem through data, through research, through anecdotes, to put real solutions in place, to comply with new state and draw laws on bullying and to measure our progress. it's a promise we want to join you in keeping to our children and our youth in california. some of you know that we started this summit yesterday with a screening of the documentary film, bully, to 3,000 students in san francisco from san francisco's public schools. the superintendent of schools you're going to hear from in a minute, he
a fat letter home? that's ridiculous. >> if you're going to be sending educational material you send it to all the parents of all the kid. >> of course. >> there may be thin kids who never eat a vegetable. he's admitted in the past. >> i'm not a big vegetable eater. i'm working on them. i drink them now. >> in vodka. >> the broader question is whether or not we have to look at what we're doing educationally in terms of whether or not all kids get what i used to get, which is at least one hour of physical education every single day. now they're racheting it. >> now schools are cancelling it. >> cancelling recesses in some cases. then the kids come home and they're on the x-box or whatever until they do their homework. so i was trying to add this up on the way to the studio. i was thinking we were probably playing three or four hours a day. you'd have an hour of physical education, 30 minutes of recess, right after school we went out and played again until our parents made us come home and do homework. this idea that our kids today are just not getting -- they're getting shortchanged.
rationale in many quarters, particularly higher education. the diversity rationale says we want to engage in special efforts to bring in people from all walks of life, all sectors, all regions, all ideological dispositions, all races. the reason why we want this is we believe that on our campuses there will be richer learning. there will be more learning, better learning, deeper learning takes place through the clash of perspective. and, you know, students will learn from one another. so the diversity rationale for affirmative action. that's some of the why affirmative action rose in the late '60s, early '70s but in these are some of the reasons that have been set for for affirmative action. okay. why is a controversial? affirmative action like all policies has cost. it has costs. what are some of those costs? there's a bunch just like there's a wide range of justifications, rationale, for affirmative action. there's also an array of costs. i'll mention a couple. let me start off with one, stigma. it's an important one because there some people, i think he neatly of the most vociferous cr
&explains why state educators say there is still a long way to go. >> the graduation rate is almost at 84%. but that means there's still a good portion of students dropping out. and state educators say that's one student too many. >> reporter: more of maryland's high school students are getting diplomas in 40 years. new numbers friday show the state's graduation rate for the class of 2012, rose just over 33%. an increase of 1.5% in two years. >> more and more of our principals are making sure that individual students complete high school education on time. >> reporter: they say it play a big part. >> i think it's really reassuring. >> they are comforted by the number. high school seniors are encouraged. >> that's good. like many people in our jobs, going to high school and graduating college. >> passing state assessment, which focusing -- focuses on english, math, and biologist. -- biology. >> i think the bridge project does help some of our students who traditionally would become very frustrated and give up. >> while the graduation rate might be up, state educators say there is still roo
on the problems we have in the country right now, rebuilding the middle class, reform our education system, making sure that our health reform system works, and works well. these are the most important things to be focusing on right now, not the 2016 campaign. >> well, you are chairman of health education, labor and pensions committee and will hold the first senate hearing on obama care tomorrow. the thing we keep hearing over and over again, we heard it on the sunday shows and heard it this morning is why did the president say if you like your health care plan, you can keep it. the associated press is reporting three and a half million people have gotten cancellation notices. what do you make of all this, senator? >> what i mean of all of this is we're missing the big picture. yes, we had problems with the rollout, that's inexcusable, but they're being fixed. but let's keep the big picture in mind. we have millions of children today, up to 17 million children with pre-existing conditions who are covered for the first time ever. we have seniors getting free preventive services, never got it before
of tablets into the schools and the kids might get the applications. it's incredible part of our education were fast forward not only are those machines and tools exposing people to a new way of manufacturing but we need to make more things and allow the world to do it in a modern way. it's not just having the workshops but exposing them to the 3-d abilities. that manufacturing that ability to manufacture onshore will be introduced right here in san francisco because of this incredible performance. they have a bio printing. what's that. some of the people from my hometown in seattle want to give him a bet on the 479 and seahawks and they want me to shave off my mustache and if i do that i don't expect too because we'll win i have bio printing to help me roar that maybe i've got a tool. the bio printing is going to be an extremely serious work. along with the playful and educational introduction we're on the verge of a huge transportation. just like when the engineers came to my office we're no longer going to use 2 dimensional we're going to help everybody to solve problems in the world. i
their ability to continue with their employment, education or family responsibilities. so the center on criminal justice would advocate for an increased use or implementation of pretrial services at the local level and some on this panel will speak with more detail on that. >> let me ask miss dewint that you are obviously part of the bail association and the president of the organization, you have decades of experience. critics have argued that your association and other associations like it use their influence by way of lobbying to protect the groups financial interest. i'm wondering if you can respond to that and perhaps give us an idea what kind of lobbying your organization does? >> thank you. first of all let me thank jeff and the san francisco public defenders office for this 10th year of the justice submit summit. thank you and i don't have a prepared speech. i do want to address some of these misconceptions. there is a bail reform and we are part of the reform. we are proud to say that we are part of our regulatory agency with the department of insurance to reestablish the industry. bu
-- what was interesting for me is the painting of the green stripes and there's a whole education component of this in terms of how they're designing it and where vehicles -- you know, where they're proposing for vehicles and the bicycle lanes to sort of merge so that cars and trucks can make a right hand turn. i think that needs to be some thought out -- i said are you going to write on the street for right turn enter here and they hadn't thought about that so i think that's where there's potential of risk with that because i -- you know, and even after having this conversation and knowing sort of, like, the serrated green stripe means that's where a vehicle can pass through, as i was coming home i wanted to make a right on to 9th street and realized oh, i had passed that serrated area. you know, even though i had that conversation, i am still not accustomed in my mind, you know, of that's where i enter to make the right hand turn and so being cognizant of that, you know, i went up a couple more blocks before i made my right hand turn instead of doing it, but i think that there n
funding in the fight over standardized testing, the new thrift -- threat from the education department. the state will dump the test that students have been taking for 14 years and given a computerized test not ready for a few years. educators have been working with officials about reconciling the dispute over testing. they are surprised by the funding threat. >> hopefully there are no tricks for the kids on halloween. >> there is in wet weather in the forecast. here are temperatures in the south bay: alum rock is cool of the at 42. san jose is 46 and santa clara and los altos hills 44, and cupertino is 43 and los gatos is warmest at 48. most of us are in the 40's again this morning. there will be 30's by the time the morning is over. 51 in san francisco and alameda for the warm spot. as far as the forecast, the next 12 hours, we have clear conditions this morning. headed to the afternoon hours, it will be calm with temperatures in the low-to-mid 60's. at 4:00, warmer than yesterday by two to four or five degrees. 62 at the cost and 68 around the bay and 72 inland and by 7:00 tomorrows
,000 dollars a year they don't pay any tuition. >>> california could lose billions to education after dumping its old state tests, but officials say they are surprised by the letter from the u.s. didn't of education threatening to with hold 3.5 billion dollars, the state says it was working with the government to work out differences in how state tests are handled this year as california transitions into a new testing program. >> the boston red sox are the world series champions and their fans partied into the night. fans poured out of fenway park and near by bars to celebrate, we have video of unfortunately there we go that fans tipped over, 9 people arrested, probably not bad considering the number of people out there, that was according to a tweet from police with the hash tags go home and celebrate responsibly. >> it hasn't happened at fenway park for 95 years. the red sox are world champions. >> that's right, 95 years, boston had not won it at all home since 1918, this is their third championship since 2004 though, they defelted the cardinals 6-1 in game 6 last night if you missed it dav
served in another position and was active and traveled around the country for the educational advocacy for the rights of lgbt people and during that period i spoke with numerous national organized having to do with help and serves for elders such as the american society on aging and task force for lblt and national alzheimer's association. so i was had the great opportunity to bring to attention the unmet needs of a very large invisible population not only in california but throughout the country. which became some of the great work that was later recognized by the state department of the aging and other organizations throughout the country and with the federal officer on aging. i'm now semi retired i live at a senior complex in san francisco. i continue to volunteer for the lgbt seniors. i'm now a representative that the health and aging program. and now that i'm a senior myself i'm getting to know what it feels like to be on the other side of the table. i remembered when i had the first legal interview how it felt so, now i know. i also want to mention i'm a licensed marriage and a f
voluntarily give everything? how to educate and to whom i am not sure people are so aware how much misinformation with a single individual they could but most of the information is inaccurate. even with the database segregators even roberta who live todd a street 50 years ago is in l.a. you come up with the aggregate to show conviction said failure to appear for the traffic violation. i don't think people realize the information that they have to try to clear there name. >> the first question is important it is not just brazil but china and every rare but the recognition that our multinational corporations are protected by the nation state and they may be a multinational and other ways but there is a parochial concern and a recognition of other areas of control a end to independence to those places to be very important and if these companies want to retain their position they will have to shape up to take on the own government. we are aid normal nation of. we don't have to control everything it takes more room to become more sensible the concerns wages, it's jobs, and we may find t
gender parody in the work force and education but still not stem jobs and women are in the work force and college enrollment but a huge gap with men and women in stem jobs. over all increases in u.s. demand for scientist and engineers, we are going to see a much greater demand. we try to encourage women in the stem field because there is a wage gap compared to non-fields for women. those in stem field are over represented in life sciences such as biology and medicine and under represented in computer science. google shared this with the staff by the national science foundation that compares the number of stem job openings with the number of college graduates through 2018. so we have a gaping hole in the number of graduates computing. there is expected to be 140,000 jobs in this field annually and only 50,000 graduates. so let's spend the next few minutes how sfusd is preparing our kids for stem fields. according to the research, there is nine computer program sections and three computer literacy classes in sfusd. the numbers are pretty low. one of the reasons is that computer science
to build an audience for it. the best way to get the word out, so to speak, and to educate people was, i thought, social media. i began. but the - my base was sci-fi geeks and nerds and i had to expand that. we tried a lot of different things. it was humour that seemed to attract a lot of people and get them to share and engage, so i started making funny comment about sci-fi and science and it expanded and i found that pictures called mims gets more, and a few kiddies gets a lot of likes and shares. so it extended more. we had a large enough audience, so i spoke about lgbt equality. there's a large overlap between sci-fi geeks and nerds and lgbt community. it exploded some more. then i introduced the sorry of the internment. people were shocked. so many people otherwise well informed didn't know about the internment. now i had people educated on the internment, i told them that we have a musical about it and we'd open in san diego at the old globe theatre and gave tastes of the songs and snippets of squeeps and developed an -- scenes, and developed an eagerness, a want to see quality, an
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